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30 Days of Writing - Day Thirty

30. Final question! Tag someone! And tell us what you like about that person as a writer and/or about one of his/her characters!

I'm going to talk about Lynn Flewelling, because she is, frankly, amazing. Lynn's stories are very richly detailed, and her world is well thought-out and well designed. This is, in part, thanks to her husband, Doug, who is an expert in geography, among other things, and a fantastic map-maker, too.

Lynn's real strength, though, is in writing characters that really draw you in. You care about Seregil and Alec and everything they do, what they feel, and what is happening to them. Similarly, in her Tamír Triad, she does such a wonderful job of making Tobin someone that you can identify with, even if you have no experience with what he is going through. She has also done a wonderful job of giving us gay, lesbian, and even trans-gender characters that are believable, and are not entirely defined by their sexuality. In a world where so much revolves around that part of our identity, it is so refreshing to read an author who writes it for what it really is: just another part of who we are, rather than having it be what we are.

I know she is currently working on her ninth novel, and the sixth in the Nightrunner series, The Casket of Souls, and I cannot begin to describe my excitement to see what Alec and Seregil are up to next.

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